Book Review: Visions of Tomorrow: Science Fiction Predictions That Came True, edited by Thomas A. Easton. (Three Stars)

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Book Review: Visions of Tomorrow: Science Fiction Predictions That Came True, edited by Thomas A. Easton.

(Three Stars)

“Finlay’s Law: Trouble comes at three AM.”

Regular readers of science fiction understand how risky projecting future trends of science and technology, not to mention sociology. But SF writers have been amazingly close on several things, as documented in this volume, published in 2008.

“Now people’s lives can be turned upside-down with a few keystrokes. Information has no mass.”

Not bad as anthologies go, keeping in mind that the accuracy of the forecast is the criterion for selection, not the quality of the writing. And howling errors abound. Yes, people in the 1960s were told the world’s population would surpass twenty billion early in the twenty-first century, then society (and population) would collapse.

“A few years of minimal breeding will not hurt this planet any. There are about nineteen and a half billion too many people on Earth already.”

Since some stories hark back half a century or more, politically incorrectness abounds. The thin-skinned and hypersensitive are forewarned.

“If there’s a rule about deals with the devil, it’s that you don’t realize you’re making one at the time.”