Forgotten Suns by Judith Tarr Three Stars

Forgotten Suns by Judith Tarr

Three stars out of Five

Almost quit after five pages. Glad I stuck with it. Well-told, imaginative science fiction with bursts into new frontiers. Nice capture of the thrill of archeology and anthropology.

First book I’ve read with post-Islamic characters. No graphic language, violence or sex issues, though Tarr diminished one of her primary cast by having her go into heat over someone in almost each new world she encountered.

If I was to quibble it’s that Tarr was so busy being politically correct that it occasionally clashed with her story. Interestingly, that issue seems to have invaded the science fiction awards process: “The Cultural Wars Invade Science Fiction.” What is PC depends on “a certain point of view.”

The cover art was pretty but had nothing to do with the story.

Still, a decent read.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Forgotten Suns by Judith Tarr Three Stars

  1. Probably won’t read. Getting ready to re-read Dr. Strange and Mr. Norell – the great fantasy book by Susanna Clarke. BBCAmerica has filmed a series. Starts next month. It’s steampunk – 2 magicians dueling to be the best the Napoleonic Era and change the course of history. Old magician and young one. My guess is you’d give it 5 stars.

  2. I read Dr. Strange & Mr Norwell in 2009, before I started posting reviews here. My review (from Goodreads.com) follows:

    Great concept, well developed, but–frankly–boring. It wasn’t the story so much as the storytelling that fell down. (The third star was a gift because I liked the concept so well.)

    Clarke has been favorably compared to Jane Austen (probably by people who have never actually read Jane Austen). Well, the style is similar, however Jane didn’t know any better. Susanna assumedly did, but adopted the archaic style to complement her period piece. Well, it worked–and it was cute–for about a hundred pages.

    And, like Austen, she left a lot of loose ends. Dickens did better.

    Other than that, my only criticism is that Clarke crammed 300 pages of story into 1006 pages of book. I forced myself to finish it.

Comments are closed.