Book Review: Influx by Daniel Suarez

Influx by Daniel Suarez

Four stars out of Five.

“Anything before you’re thirty-five is new and exciting, and anything after that is proof that the world’s going to hell.”

Excellent. Hard science fiction that grabs the reader by the throat and doesn’t let go. A haunting tale about the government trying to protect us from ourselves. The premise is that for the last fifty years an increasingly powerful bureau of the federal government has been identifying and sequestering scientific breakthroughs–and their inventors–because such inventions, no matter how beneficial, might dispute society.

Good development, pace and storytelling–even though it opens with twenty pages of techno-babble.

Interestingly, that the rest of the government tries to contain the rogue bureau without telling, much less involving, the elected branches because they hold the people and their representatives in as low esteem as does the Bureau of Technology Control.

Quibble: one gravity of upward attraction shouldn’t break “diamond nanorods.”

Even apparently “bad” people–some of them–may repent of their evil and sacrifice themselves for the good. Recent research suggests that the “civic gene”, or at least a disposition to self-sacrifice on behalf of the greater good, does exist.

“We don’t know what we don’t know until we know.”

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5 thoughts on “Book Review: Influx by Daniel Suarez

  1. I’m impressed at how fast you read Influx! Glad it was riveting. If I can plow thru the tech stuff sounds like I’d enjoy it. It’s on my list. Thanks.

    • The first pages are a bit tedious, but those who preserver will be rewarded with a fine example of classic hard science fiction, with the normal bowing to modern sensibilities.

  2. Happy to find your blog! While my own writing focus is largely on food, I’ve started offering fiction and nonfiction book giveaways. In crafting reviews, I am happy to learn from folks who have been at this longer than I! 🙂

    • Mine are not typical reviews. Since summaries are readily available, I seldom dwell on the characters or structure other than to rate how I react to the presentation.
      Thank you.

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